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What If It Mattered How We Treat Candidates


Economic challenges are allowing organizations to dodge bullets when it comes to the candidate experience.  But times are changing.  As key talent becomes more difficult to recruit, then brand and reputation matter.  And the candidate experience becomes a more significant influence on those key indicators.

 

In the BtoB (business to business) world, it seems that buyers make up their minds prior to meeting a vendor.  Recent data suggests that between 70-75% of decision making is completed prior to contacting a vendor or solutions provider.   If that is true, I wonder what happens in the BtoC (business to consumer) world.  In other words, how many job seekers have made their choices prior to speaking to a recruiter from your organization?  Further, I wonder how many prospects say “no” to your recruiter based on faulty information that was discovered on the internet. 

 

One thing I have noticed is that organizations have a false sense of security around how candidates perceive their brand.  Most organizations are surveying the candidate experience from the chosen few that actually go through the interview process.  Naturally, those responses are going to great; they have just received a white glove service.  I wonder what would happen if we surveyed all candidates that applied for a job–even the ones that we reject. 

 

Thought leader David Earle of Staffing.org makes this point when he writes; “corporate recruiting is the only B to C endeavor on the planet that invites 100 people to a party, then makes 95 of them stand out in the rain.” 

 

The sea change that the social revolution taught us is that the brand is no longer in charge; the customer was is truly in charge.  The shift occurred because brands had lost credibility and in the new social environment that embraces transparency.  Naturally, this was a shocking reality to brands that were accustomed to controlling the message to their customers and this new requirement for visibility was challenging.  When the talent that we are pursuing demands to be treated like a customer and be granted transparency into the recruiting process, how will that be received?

 

What would happen if we treated candidate like a customer?  Ironically, in many cases, candidates are actually customers of our goods and services.  One wonders how the “job customer” treatment influences the “product customer;” that would certainly be an interesting research project.

 

Study after study tells us that candidates are dissatisfied with the way they are treated as a job applicant.  The complaints range from lack of feedback and impersonal communication to overly challenging application processes.  These are the type of complaints that would cause the business side of things to lose customers.  So far as we know, it hasn’t cost us job customers.  So far as we know…yet.

 

 I believe the treatment of candidates will become a top concern in talent acquisition.   Our current approach is a ticking time bomb.  There is every reason to believe that customer expectations on the product or business side are going to spill over to the job side of things.  One day we are going to see feedback from a job candidate that publicly voices displeasure with the way they were treated by an organization during the job recruitment process.  And, other candidates that that have shared a similar experience, add their voices.  The end result is going to an uproar that dramatically impacts an organization.  An uproar that cannot be ignored and will damage brands and reputation; we saw this with Dell (“Dell Hell”), Verizon and other consumer brands.  If we act now, this situation is preventable—we just need to treat candidates like it matters.

I Am Still a PC


Yesterday was my last day at Microsoft. I was afforded a great opportunity to create and impact recruiting; an outcome that I did not anticipate when I joined the company five years ago. It was a humbling experience working with the best and the brightest; I was amazed by my colleagues. Amazed, not by just how smart everyone is; but by the quality of human beings they are and the values that are shared. We did some great work together that changed the face of recruiting not only at Microsoft for the recruiting industry globally.

And during that process, I became a big fan of Microsoft and its products and services. And the question has arisen; will I continue to be a fan of Microsoft?

Absolutely, I will continue to be a fan; there is a long term impact of the Microsoft Kool-Aid. For my MAC friends, I still prefer a PC. For my Google friends, I will continue to “Google It on Bing.” For my iPhone friends; I gave up my Blackberry when I joined Microsoft. And frankly, I missed my Blackberry.

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